FAQ

Question

How long has WRR been in existence?

Answer

Wildlife Rescue & Rehabilitation, Inc. was founded in 1977 by Lynn Cuny, who began caring for injured animals in her home. Since then, it has evolved into a 212-acre facility in Kendalia, which provides permanent and temporary homes for the 7,000 animals rescued each year, and the WRR Sherman Animal Care Complex in San Antonio.

Question

Don’t we already have a wildlife rescue group in Austin? Why do we do we need another?

Answer

Austin does have a wildlife rescue group; it is made up of volunteers who take injured animals into their homes for rehabilitation. The local organization does not have a sanctuary. WRR works with Austin Wildlife Rescue when an animal needs to go to a sanctuary for permanent care.

Question

Is there a fee for bringing in an animal that is hurt or sick?

Answer

WRR is a nonprofit organization. We gladly accept donations, but do not charge for our services.

Question

When is it appropriate to bring an animal to WRR?

Answer

If you find an injured animal, we ask that you immediately call our 24-Hour Emergency Hotline at 830.336.2725.

Question

Does WRR receive federal funds or other government assistance?

Answer

WRR does not receive federal assistance and relies on private donations and grants for funding. We are a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt nonprofit organization incorporated in the state of Texas.

Question

Can I become a member of WRR? What about volunteer work?

Answer

You can become a member of WRR through DONATIONS or VOLUNTEER work.

Question

I’d like to educate my children about native wildlife. Can we visit the Sanctuary?

Answer

WRR is not a zoo and does not allow public tours of the Sanctuary. Instead, we recommend getting information through books, videos, and by exposing your children to parks and other natural areas.

Question

Does WRR work with other wildlife/environmental organizations?

Answer

We work with other organizations that need assistance in caring for animals and are also a member of the Global Federation of  Animal Sanctuaries (GFAS), a national accrediting organization that assists sanctuaries in providing quality rescue and care for displaced animals.

Question

As a city dweller, what can I do to help protect wildlife?

Answer

The best thing to do with a wild animal is to leave him/her alone. Most wild animals want nothing to do with humans, and will try to avoid contact. Click HERE for more tips and information on dealing with urban wildlife.

Saving lives since 1977. Help us continue that effort. DONATE TODAY!